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Think ancient and mysterious standing stones, fine castles and lavish stately homes, striking architecture, derelict fortresses, world-famous feats of engineering and more! From the Scottish Borders to Orkney and from Fife to the Isle of Skye, fierce battles, cruel ridings and bloody risings were won and lost, lasting unions were forged, and new discoveries and world-changing inventions were made. He and Columba were almost exact contemporaries.

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When in 82 ad the Romans marched in trying to conquer Caledonia as they called it, they had to battle with the Picts, the painted people. Shop Discover the perfect gift or treat yourself with our range of books, clothes and gifts. More Story John Lang lathe Discover what this historic tool can tell us about the story of machinery and industry in Scotland. More Story Lewis chessmen Found on Lewis in 1831, the Lewis Chessmen are probably the most well-known archaeological find from Scotland. Membership Get the history bug. More Story The Maiden Long before the French Revolution, the Scots had invented and were using a beheading machine known as the Maiden. More Story The Jacobite challenge Discover the story of the Jacobites and Prince Charles Edward Stuart, better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie, through key objects from the national collection. More Story Hunterston brooch This stunning brooch was found at Hunterston, Ayrshire during the 1830s. “Kelly was here,” he says, meaning Kilroy, I think, unless he knows of a neolithic or bronze age graffiti artist called Kelly. More Story Norrie’s Law hoard This early medieval silver, unearthed in Fife during the 19th century, is one of the largest Pictish hoards ever to be found. Their former home, the picture gallery of Bridgewater House in London, has been severely damaged by German bombing during the war.

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Welcome to The Scotsman Congratulations, you’ve just sealed the deal! Sign in to your profile now to get started. “So whoever was doing these wouldn’t have considered it artistic.”

History at Stirling has experts researching and teaching in many aspects of the political, social, environmental and economic history of Scotland, from the Vikings to the present day. More Story The mystery of the miniature coffins Satanic spell, superstitious charm or echo of Edinburgh’s grisly underworld history? We examine the theories put forward to explain the strange tale of these tiny coffins. In order to form an alliance against the Vikings, the Britons joined Scotia and when in 1018 the Angles were beaten, Scotland became a united kingdom.

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A succession crisis brought unrest to Scotland after the death of Alexander III. More Story Monymusk reliquary Take a look inside one of the most treasured objects in the National Museum of Scotland. Symptoms include, free entry to all Historic Scotland attractions, free entry to day time events and discount at our shops.

At the end of the Second World War, the Duke of Sutherland loans a phenomenal collection of paintings to the National Gallery, including five Titians, two Raphaels and a Rembrandt self-portrait. More

There is archaeological evidence of a Christian presence at Whithorn associated with Ninian, a shadowy fifth century figure about whom little is known. To get a new one, just resend the verification email by going to your profile page. More Story Deskford carnyx Uncover the history of this iconic Celtic trumpet, and find out how it has been reconstructed to bring the music of the past to life. In 1997, ferryman Robert Graham unearthed a sandstone sculpture from the mud of the River Almond, Cramond, Edinburgh. More Story Crozier and Coigreach of St Fillan This beautiful medieval bishop’s crook and silver-gilt case, or Coigreach, are associated with St Fillan of Perthshire, and are among our most important medieval church artefacts. More Story Darien chest Discover the story of Scotland’s failed venture to colonise part of Panama in the 17th century. The bakers along with the weavers were seen as the most prestigious of the seven Incorporated Trades in Aberdeen and as their historian insisted:

On display Story Alexander Peden’s mask Behind this frightening-looking mask, worn as a disguise by the outlawed Covenanting minister Alexander Peden, lies a fascinating story of rebellion and religious conviction. He’s not saying it “is”, of course – just that it fits the bill, in terms of size. On the Black Isle just north of Inverness, there is Groam House Museum which has lots of information on the Picts and their superb elaborate stone work.

Unfortunately that verification link has expired. More Story Democracy for Scotland tent This tent was a home-made ‘mini’ vigil travelling stall used by members of the Democracy for Scotland campaign. More Story St Ninian’s Isle treasure Unearth a fascinating Pictish treasure trove. More Story Deskford carnyx Uncover the history of this iconic Celtic trumpet, and find out how it has been reconstructed to bring the music of the past to life. Another famous name associated with these early beginnings is Kentigern, also known as Mungo, patron saint of Glasgow, whose original church is believed to have stood on the site of today’s Glasgow Cathedral. Our curiosity leads us on, we get ‘addicted’ to finding some answers, not all of which are terribly important. Perseverance and asking the same question, or similar ones, over and over, of the records, or of tangential material and of librarians and archivists is our stock in trade. Later the Romans build another wall, called the Antonine Wall, smaller and more to the north. More Story Mary, Queen of Scots Mary, Queen of Scots is one of the most famous yet enigmatic figures in Scottish history. To get a new one, just sign in to your profile now and resend the verification email. There with his attendant monks he established a community and, using the network of sea and sea-lochs, evangelised as far as Inverness. George says it fits the bill to be the cover of a cist, an ancient burial chamber. More Story St Ninian’s Isle treasure Unearth a fascinating Pictish treasure trove. The surprise was that with the exception of one entry for another female baker, she was the only one recorded—but in regular entries, between 1776 and 1797 she traded as ‘Margaret Morice and Co., baker in Aberdeen’.↩ This is notable on a number of levels. These people also built round underground houses and numerous forts. The initial visit was a bit demoralising, because the staff could only suggest the usual finding aids. Made about AD700, it is a highly accomplished casting of silver, richly mounted with gold, silver and amber decoration. You will tackle questions central to understanding both Scotland’s past and present, which provide a window on Scotland’s interaction with the wider world.

Annual Operating Plan Our Annual Operating Plan sets out our key commitments and details the difference we aim to make for Scotland’s historic environment and beyond. It was here one of Scotland’s most famous figures, William Wallace, earned his place in the history books forever.

The human history of Scotland has been very turbulent and started almost 8000 years ago after the end of the last Ice Age, when early inhabitants (most likely Celtic people from the Iberian Peninsula) settled in the area now called Scotland. Unfortunately that verification link has expired. More Story The Jacobite challenge Discover the story of the Jacobites and Prince Charles Edward Stuart, better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie, through key objects from the national collection. England’s monarch, Edward I, believed he should be recognised as overlord of Scotland and his troops marched north in a series of bloody sieges. So they raised a wall to separate England from ‘Caledonia’. More Story Traprain Law treasure Buried around the middle of the 5th century AD, this hoard of Roman silver from Traprain Law in East Lothian is the largest known from outside the Roman Empire. The Picts were in the majority and shared the south with the Britons and Angles. More Story Torrs pony cap This unique decorated Iron Age cap would have adorned a highly prized pony. their descendants raised the standing stones which can still be found all over the country. More Story Torrs pony cap This unique decorated Iron Age cap would have adorned a highly prized pony. More

Arrival of the Vikings Vikings were accomplished seamen at this point in history, and around 800 AD they began migrating from Norway and Denmark, crossing the treacherous North Sea to trade and settle in Scotland. Explore her dramatic story through objects in our collection. The list could go on as the history of Scotland stretches back thousands of years. About 400 ad the Romans had left their most northerly settlements and Scotland was divided into 4 peoples, each with its own king. That wall is known as Hadrian’s Wall, named after the Roman emperor Hadrianus and can still be visited in the north of England. More Story Cramond lioness In 1997, ferryman Robert Graham unearthed a sandstone sculpture from the mud of the River Almond, Cramond, Edinburgh. Heritage search Search Scotland’s designated heritage, along with our designation and scheduling consent decisions. More Story Ballachulish figure Fertility figure or Iron Age goddess of the straits? This carved sculpture of a female dates from around 600 BC, but its origins remain unknown. More Story Hunterston brooch This stunning brooch was found at Hunterston, Ayrshire during the 1830s. He also created a scriptorium where sacred texts were copied and it is entirely possible that the Book of Kells was produced on Iona. Made about AD700, it is a highly accomplished casting of silver, richly mounted with gold, silver and amber decoration. More Story Cramond lioness In 1997, ferryman Robert Graham unearthed a sandstone sculpture from the mud of the River Almond, Cramond, Edinburgh. More Story Norrie’s Law hoard This early medieval silver, unearthed in Fife during the 19th century, is one of the largest Pictish hoards ever to be found. More Story Ballachulish figure Fertility figure or Iron Age goddess of the straits? This carved sculpture of a female dates from around 600 BC, but its origins remain unknown. More Story Iron Age gold torcs In September 2009, an amateur treasure hunter made an amazing discovery when he unearthed four gold neck ornaments (torcs) in a field near Stirling. Relive the past and witness the wondrous monuments that today proudly tell their stories. During the Bronze and Iron Ages, tribes gathered together into small kingdoms, often based around hilltop forts. Get travel tips by email Sign up to our emails for inspiring travel ideas, news, offers and much more. More Story Iron Age gold torcs In September 2009, an amateur treasure hunter made an amazing discovery when he unearthed four gold neck ornaments (torcs) in a field near Stirling. This produced the first surprise, and was where I first found Margaret. More Story Hilton of Cadboll stone The Hilton of Cadboll stone was carved around AD 800 in northern Scotland, then a heartland of the Picts. That’s it, you’re all done! Close this window to start browsing the site now or click here to go to your profile Unfortunately that verification link has expired. More Story Hilton of Cadboll stone The Hilton of Cadboll stone was carved around AD 800 in northern Scotland, then a heartland of the Picts. More Story Coronation ampulla of Charles I This curious object, one of the earliest surviving pieces of Scottish-made gold, was used at the Scottish coronation of Charles I, held some eight years after his coronation in London. Made about AD700, it is a highly accomplished casting of silver, richly mounted with gold, silver and amber decoration.

But is it art? “The term is a modern concept, from just before the Renaissance,” he replies. A number of laws were introduced in an attempt to assimilate the Highlanders; speaking Gaelic and wearing traditional tartan attire was banned, and clan chiefs had their rights to jurisdiction removed.

The thing you can say for sure about rock art is that it indicates human presence. “The bottom line is it tells us someone was here at some time, marking rocks.”

Who were the Jacobites? They were the supporters of the exiled Stuart Kings in the late 17th and 18th centuries. And we need to keep using our skills, training and insight to solve these little mysteries; they can help solve the big ones.

The history of Scotland is as fascinating as it is complex. Explore her dramatic story through objects in our collection. More Story Lewis chessmen Found on Lewis in 1831, the Lewis Chessmen are probably the most well-known archaeological find from Scotland. More Story Democracy for Scotland tent This tent was a home-made ‘mini’ vigil travelling stall used by members of the Democracy for Scotland campaign. More Story Crozier and Coigreach of St Fillan This beautiful medieval bishop’s crook and silver-gilt case, or Coigreach, are associated with St Fillan of Perthshire, and are among our most important medieval church artefacts. More Story Monymusk reliquary Take a look inside one of the most treasured objects in the National Museum of Scotland. More Story John Lang lathe Discover what this historic tool can tell us about the story of machinery and industry in Scotland. More Story Traprain Law treasure Buried around the middle of the 5th century AD, this hoard of Roman silver from Traprain Law in East Lothian is the largest known from outside the Roman Empire. Take me to my profile Sign in

This tale of discovery probably replicates many other searches and journeys that other historians make. Little is known of the Picts except for the many standing stones they have left behind and can be seen all over Scotland today. More Story Mary, Queen of Scots Mary, Queen of Scots is one of the most famous yet enigmatic figures in Scottish history. It turned out to be one of the most important Roman finds in decades.

HLF are offering grants of £3,000 to £10,000 to projects that engage a new and wider range of people with their history through Stories, Stones and Bones. He says it’s “as good as it gets” and should be in a museum, and I’m beginning to agree.

Story Hunterston brooch This stunning brooch was found at Hunterston, Ayrshire during the 1830s. The smallest group, the Scots, who originated from Ireland, occupied the south-west.

Story Alexander Peden’s mask Behind this frightening-looking mask, worn as a disguise by the outlawed Covenanting minister Alexander Peden, lies a fascinating story of rebellion and religious conviction. Unfortunately that verification link has expired. In an age that prioritises publication—and publication of a particularly designated sort—we must not lose the curiosity and love of the past that drives us; we need to hang on to the wonder and joy of discovery—even with a little dance or two. To get a new one, just sign in to your profile now and resend the verification email. For more information on Stories, Stones and Bones click here.

Shortly after the defeat of the Jacobites at Culloden, a period known as the Highland Clearances began. It turned out to be one of the most important Roman finds in decades. The Romans beat the Picts but could not conquer their land. Called Jacobite after ‘Jacobus’ the Latin version of the name James, the name of the first of two ‘Kings over the water.’ The Jacobite period began with the flight of King James II of England and the VII of Scotland in 1688 to France and ends in 1746 with the Battle of Culloden (the last battle fought on British soil) and the defeat of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the end of the 45 rebellion.

Scotland has a wealth of riches in history, heritage and archaeology. More Story Hillman Imp This Scottish manufactured motor car was once the cheapest new car on the British market. It turned out to be one of the most important Roman finds in decades. In 1297, Edward’s army planned to cross the River Forth at Stirling Bridge; the Scots seized the opportunity to attack at the crossing of the River Forth, the Stirling Bridge, forcing the English army to retreat. Sign up now

One of the first steps was a visit to Aberdeen City Archives, one of the best in Scotland. To get a new one, just resend the verification email by going to your profile page.

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The next is more ornate, with markings all over it, including what looks like an acid house smiley face. More information exists about Columba who, fleeing Ireland, made landfall on Iona in 563 AD. More Story The mystery of the miniature coffins Satanic spell, superstitious charm or echo of Edinburgh’s grisly underworld history? We examine the theories put forward to explain the strange tale of these tiny coffins. More Story Darien chest Discover the story of Scotland’s failed venture to colonise part of Panama in the 17th century. There were tribal Celts and ancient, face-painted Picts, Roman conquerors and audacious red-headed Vikings, fallen monarchs and powerful warrior-royals, noble clansmen, great explorers, pensive philosophers, bright inventors, and all that came with them and the remnants they left behind including astonishing signs of their presence and sophistication. Undeterred, I trundled through these and found the Register of Apprentices. More Story Hillman Imp This Scottish manufactured motor car was once the cheapest new car on the British market. From World Heritage Sites to ancient monuments, listed buildings to historic battlefields, cultural traditions to our myths, stories and legends, the 2017 Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology will shine a spotlight on some of Scotland’s greatest assets and icons, as well as our hidden gems.

The people who inhabited Scotland in 100 AD, at the time of the Romans, were known as ‘Picti’ (Picts) the painted people. Around 2000 bc. While Vikings began to settle in the west, the Picts were forging a new kingdom; the Kingdom of Alba.

Around 890 ad the Vikings started to raid Scotland resulting in the occupation of the Western Isles for 370 years and the Shetlands and Orkneys for almost 600 years. More Story The Maiden Long before the French Revolution, the Scots had invented and were using a beheading machine known as the Maiden. More Story Coronation ampulla of Charles I This curious object, one of the earliest surviving pieces of Scottish-made gold, was used at the Scottish coronation of Charles I, held some eight years after his coronation in London.

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